10 Tips for the Newly Sober to Get Through the Holidays

10 Tips for the Newly Sober to Get Through the Holidays

Did you know that according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, Americas dedicate approximately 1% of their spending on alcohol? That's a hefty chunk of our paychecks. It pays off in many ways to choose sobriety during the holidays.


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What Are Some Fun Ways to Celebrate Sobriety?

What Are Some Fun Ways to Celebrate Sobriety?

Is your one-year anniversary of being sober coming up? 

This isn't any old birthday celebration. Your sobriety anniversary is a monumental date that shows how far you've come. You've worked hard for this celebration.

Not sure how to plan this special event? There are tons of options to suit how you want to spend the day. 

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6 Amazing Gifts for Recovering Alcoholics

6 Amazing Gifts for Recovering Alcoholics

6 Amazing Gifts for Recovering Alcoholics

6 Amazing Gifts for Recovering Alcoholics

Heartfelt and meaningful gifts are a great way to show that you care and support your loved ones no matter what. Here are 6 amazing gifts for recovering alcoholics that are a beautiful way to show your support!

Realizing someone close to you is an alcoholic is one of the hardest things in life to face. But, imagine how much harder addiction is for the person who is struggling with it.

He or she needs your support as they work to recover, and even after they've reached sobriety, too.

One way you can show your loved one you still care is to give them a gift to celebrate their recovery. You may choose to do this as you're picking them up from rehab or as they reach important milestones in their sobriety - like being 1 year or 10 years clean.

You can also buy gifts for recovering alcoholics just because. If you're not sure what to buy, though, check out the list of suggestions below.


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8 Strategies for Staying Sober During Family Reunions

8 Strategies for Staying Sober During Family Reunions

Staying sober can be essentially challenging when in social situations surrounded by family. Do you share that you are sober now? How do handle people offering you alcohol?

We're going to give you 5 great sobriety tips for staying sober at your next family reunion.

1. Make a Plan

Prepare before the reunion what you are going to do when someone offers you a drink. You are at a gathering where people will be drinking and partying, so someone will most likely offer you a drink.

You don't owe anyone an explanation on why you are getting clean. Come up with a response and stick to it so that you aren't tempted.

A great way to prevent the whole situation from happening is to grab a water or soda early on. People are less likely to offer you a drink if they see you already have one in hand.

2. Why Aren't You Drinking?

If someone does offer you a drink a natural question will be why you aren't drinking. Now it's your family, maybe they already know you are sober.

If this is the case you can politely remind them that you are sober now. Or you can say that you realized you had a problem and decided it would be best to stop drinking.

If you aren't comfortable talking about trying to stay sober, there are plenty of other responses you can have at the ready. For example, you could say that you just don't feel like drinking.

You could say that you are the designated driver for others, which is mostly a true statement anyway. You could say that your current diet or medication prevents you from drinking.

3. Set a Time Limit and an Out

Family situations can be stressful. This is especially true when it is a large family reunion where there are more than a normal amount of family members in one place.

Setting a time limit for yourself can help you cope with the situation while you're in it. It will also limit the amount of time you spend in a situation that may cause you stress and trigger you to want to drink.

Preparing your out in advance ensures that when you've hit your limit and you need to leave, you can. If you drive yourself, then you're set.

If you drove to the reunion with others, or the reunion is where you are staying, you need an alternate plan. Maybe this means you arrange with a friend to be available to come get you.

You could have uber at the ready to get a ride. If the reunion is at a destination you can scope the place out before you go.

Look for options that allow you to "take a time out" from the situation. This could be at the destination or a nearby coffee shop.

4. Get a Buddy

Have someone that you trust be with you at the family reunion to help hold you accountable for your sobriety. It is a lot easier to stay sober when there is someone else there.

This is especially true if you are early on in your sobriety when temptations are stronger and easier to fall for. Don't think it has to be a family member, you could bring a significant other or close friend.

5. Avoid People Pleasing

Remember that just because they are your family doesn't mean you should feel obligated. Do not feel like you need to do anything you are not comfortable doing.

It can be tough to stay strong when you are facing a group, but remember that you and your sobriety are more important. Think about what situations make you uncomfortable and prepare yourself to say no to them.

We all know who that "toxic" family member is, we all have one. Limit your time with these family members as they will increase your stress and risk level.

If you can't avoid them, try planning on limiting your time at the reunion. Only go for a day or two instead of the whole week.

6. Have Realistic Expectations

Life and people aren't perfect, so set realistic expectations for your family reunion. Your family members probably haven't made major changes.

The conflicts that popped up in the past will probably pop up again. Accept them, take ownership of your role, and let it go.

Resist the urge to try and control the situation and others. You can't control how other people are.

7. Plan Activities

Don't let yourself end up sitting around for hours with family drinking and talking. There are plenty of other activities you can do with your family that doesn't involve drinking.

Don't let yourself fall into romanticising alcohol. When family members start bringing up the past and romanticising drunken events, remove yourself.

8. Find the Local Meeting

Before you go to the family reunion, locate when and where the local AA meetings are held. This will be the support system you need when the family starts becoming too much.

If you already know when and where the meeting is you remove the excuse of not knowing. You'll most likely need to go to a meeting after being surrounded by all of your family for extended periods of time.

Staying Sober

The smartest thing you can do when staying sober at a family reunion is to make a plan and prepare for your family reunion. Get your responses ready for the tough questions, and remember that you don't owe anyone any explanations.

Know where your out is, and where you can go if you need a break from the situation. Look up where the local meetings are.

Check out these great meditation tips you can take with you and use at your next family reunion.

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6 Tips for Maintaining Sobriety in 2018

6 Tips for Maintaining Sobriety in 2018

The holiday season is officially over, which means that a new year is upon us. And with a new year comes new resolutions. One of the most popular seems to be maintaining sobriety.

Alcoholism is an extremely serious disease that affects millions of people every day. In addition to tearing apart families and social circles, it can cause liver and brain damage and in extreme cases, may be fatal.

Sobriety is tough enough on its own, but it gets even harder when you start to realize that temptation is practically everywhere.

Keep your mind and body sharp by knowing what to expect. Here are six easy tips on maintaining sobriety in 2018.

1. Maintaining Sobriety Is a Marathon, Not a Sprint

When it comes to sobriety, there's a common saying that sobriety is a marathon, not a sprint. It may not be the newest phrase on earth, but it's certainly poignant.

Sobriety isn't something that can be accomplished in a set number of days. Even with the help of a 12 step program, you'll face temptations all the time.

Instead, it's important that you approach your sobriety as a journey of sorts. Like anything worth doing in life, it's going to take time and plenty of effort.

If you're just beginning your sober journey, expect a rough beginning. Depending on the severity of your addiction, you may experience nausea, profuse sweating, and sudden outbursts.

For your safety, consult a physician before quitting cold turkey. Your body gets used to certain chemicals and substances, and depriving your system of those substances suddenly puts your body in a state of shock.

Be safe and be patient. Sobriety may be tough, but you're tougher.

2. Grow Your Support System

During your initial days of sobriety staying away from alcohol can feel daunting. You may feel alone and like no one understands. But the truth is you have tons of people around you who love and support you no matter what.

Psychologists suggest that having a strong support system in place is a great way to stay sober and those who have a strong circle of friends and family are likelier to stay sober than those who walk their path alone.

There will be days where maintaining sobriety feels almost impossible. It's precisely during these dark days that you'll need to turn to your loved ones. It's a good idea to surround yourself with sober individuals, or at least individuals that won't pressure you into drinking.

3. Remind Yourself Why You're Quitting

Everyone has their own personal reasons for maintaining sobriety. It may be for your own health, for your family, relationship, or even your career.

Whatever your reason, physically writing out your reasons for quitting is a great, cathartic exercise. Grab a piece of a paper and a pencil and find a quiet area.
Take a few moments to reflect on your life. What is it that made you choose to quit?

There's no right or wrong answer. Write down whatever you think is important enough to get you to stop drinking.

Then, once you've finished, fold up the paper and keep it in a drawer or private area. When you're feeling tempted to drink, open up the list and remind yourself once again what you're fighting for.

4. Give Yourself a Physical Reminder

It's nice to have a piece of paper to turn to, but plenty of people would rather have a physical reminder of their sobriety. For those that want a reminder to stay strong at all times, we'd suggest picking up an affirmation chip.

With tons of different options, there's sure to be an affirmation chip that's right for you. These trinkets offer both comfort and accountability.

Imagine having one of those days where everything seems to be going wrong.

Work is tough, you didn't get enough sleep last night, and you overhear your coworkers talking about grabbing drinks after work. You want to partake, but then you remember that helpful little coin in your pocket.

One day at a time, it says. Suddenly, you're reminded why it may not be such a great idea to head to the bar tonight. And just like that, your token of sobriety keeps your temptation in check.

5. Learn Your Triggers

Alcoholism in and of itself is often a symptom of something else. There's always a reason why someone turns to the bottle. Understanding what it is that makes you drink is a great way to keep yourself in check.

Determining your triggers may not be something you can accomplish on your own. Don't be afraid to reach out and talk to a mental health professional or a trusted confidante at your local AA meeting.

There are plenty of people out there who would love to help you get to the bottom of your addiction, and the sooner you understand what attracts you to alcohol, the sooner you can understand how to fix it and what to avoid.

6. Be Vocal About Maintaining Sobriety

Sobriety is never something that should be hidden or looked down upon, even by those who actively imbibe. It takes immense personal strength and fortitude to quit self-destructive behaviors.

Yet so many addicts find it tough to talk about maintaining sobriety as if there's a stigma. But vocalizing one's sobriety is a fantastic way to inspire yourself and others.

Don't be afraid to share your story with those around you. Sobriety is, after all, a journey that no one can take alone.

Reach out to others around you. Consider sponsoring a newly recovering addict at your local AA meeting, or just share your own story with friends.

Your desire to maintain sobriety has the capacity to affect everyone around you for the better. Imagine how much of a difference you can make by letting others know why you're staying sober.

Maintaining Sobriety is Tough, Let Us Help

Truth be told, there's no easy way to stay sober. But you have what it takes. Stay strong, and don't be afraid to share your journey with the world. You never know who you may inspire.

Don't forget to pick up your personal token to help you maintain sobriety. Get in touch or browse our shop to find the perfect recovery gift.

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10 Ideas for the Perfect Alcohol Recovery Gift

10 Ideas for the Perfect Alcohol Recovery Gift


It can be tough to find thoughtful gifts for loved ones at the best of times.

But it can be extra challenging when your loved one is recovering from alcoholism. It's common for people to be so concerned about giving a present that doesn't trigger relapse that they freeze and do nothing.

This is especially true if you want to give your loved one something to acknowledge their recovery and all they've overcome. Giving a recovery gift is a beautiful gesture.

So, instead of shying away from giving a gift to celebrate a recovery milestone, embrace the opportunity. The key is to remain thoughtful of what helps your loved one manage stress.

To get you on the right track, here are 10 ideas for recovery gifts.


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What to Expect From Being One Year Sober

What to Expect From Being One Year Sober

If you've got or are on the cusp of earning your 365-day token, congratulations! 

Hitting the one year sober milestone is something to be proud of. The first twelve months of sobriety can be very difficult, but what should you expect in the aftermath?

Well, for one, your odds of staying sober improve dramatically. An eight-year study showed that less than half of those who achieved a year of sobriety relapsed. That number continued to tumble as time went on...

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How to Stay Sober at Social Events

As the spring turns to summer, social events begin to take precedence in our lives.

We'll get to cherish time with loved ones and friends while creating brand new memories.

But for many in recovery, social events are synonymous with stress. But being sober doesn't need to be equated with being a shut-in. In fact, going out and being social can be beneficial to your mental well-being!


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